Is Agua Caliente Park and natural spring drying up? (part 3 of 3)

As many of you know, Agua Caliente Park is experiencing the full force of the extended drought and change in the water table level.

There were originally two springs at Agua Caliente, one a “Hot Spring” and the other a “Cold Spring”.  The two springs produced a water flow of up to 500 gallons per minute.

Agua Caliente’s springs were blasted in the mid-1930’s reducing the water flow to 150 – 300 gallons per minute.  The spring was again blasted in the early 1960’s which cut the water flow down to 100 to 125 gallons per minute!

Agua Caliente Spring in Tucson
the water level is low at Agua Caliente Pond

During Tucson’s drought of 2003-4, the water flow from Agua Caliente’s spring fell as low as 14 gallons per minute.  Pima County Parks and Recreation put in a supplemental well.   Arizona Department of Water Resources limits the water withdrawal to 55,000 gallons of supplemental well water for the pond each day.

low water levels in the pond
is Agua Caliente drying up?

The exposed mud at the park is due to increasing natural sedimentation in the pond, declining spring flow from the ongoing drought, and insufficient recharge from rainfall.

Pima County is working to stabilize Agua Caliente’s pond system and minimized ecological impacts to the system.

is Agua Caliente Spring drying up
warning signs for the exposed areas

Evaporation from the pond surface and transpiration from the cattails and palm trees growing around Agua Caliente’s pond contribute to extra water loss.

Tucson's natural spring is dry?
Agua Caliente streams are dry

Analysis is ongoing for the framework for the long-term actions to address the low water conditions at Agua Caliente.

Over the years, the water holding capacity of the pond has changed.  Renovations will need installation of some type of liner system.  Contouring the pond is a main focus for long-term stability.

RECENT HEAVY RAINS !!  Sept 2013

natural spring and pond in Tucson
heavy rains have helped raise the water levels
wading birds at Agua Caliente in Tucson
Great Blue Herons enjoying the rains and abundant cattails
Agua Caliente Park has an abundance of wildlife
Mud and Painted turtles are still happy basking in the sun

This is a complex issue that needs the public’s understanding and acceptance as Tucson gives new life to the aging historical pond.

Pima County hopes to include improvements to Agua Caliente Park in the next bond election.

For more interesting information about Agua Caliente in Tucson see the links below:

http://tjsgarden.com/2013/08/16/agua-caliente-history-natural-spring-park-tucson-az/

http://tjsgarden.com/2013/09/07/best-picnics-family-time-perfect-weddings-tucson-spring-park/

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The best picnics, family time and perfect weddings at Agua Caliente Spring – (part 2 of 3)

We make it a point to take visitors to Agua Caliente Park.  This is an amazing lagoon; a get away from the prickly pear cacti and saguaros. It’s hard to tell that you’re even in Tucson. Agua Caliente presents you with an abundance of mature shade trees and lush backgrounds for picnics, weddings and even Plein-Air paintings.

family and picnics in the park
one of the best locations for picnics

Roy P. Drachman Agua Caliente Park has a natural hot spring that flows through faults between gneissic rock and has been a long-inhabited settlement.

  • What is gneissic rock?   This type of rock has minerals arranged into layers which seem to be bands that alternate darker and lighter colors. The banding is developed under high temperature and pressure conditions.

Ok now, is Agua Caliente a park, a lake, or a wildlife habitat?  Well this natural spring is a bit of everything!  Pack a picnic, hang out and be sure to bring a camera.

park with water in Tucson, AZ
Gallery and Tucson Audubon in the historic ranch house

If you enjoy bird watching then Agua Caliente Park is worth a visit.  The Tucson Audubon Society is housed in the original Ranch home.

historic house in Tucson
the original Ranch House at Agua Caliente Park

Take a look inside this historic building and enjoy the gift shop and gallery.

Hohokam historical sites
Agua Caliente natural spring in Arizona

The eccentricity of the mountains and mature palm trees are reflected with vibrant color in the water.

Here you can picnic at a 101 acre aquatic / riparian habitat surrounded by the Sonoran Desert.

wildlife parks in Tucson, Arizona
ducks at Agua Caliente Park

At Agua Caliente you will see a variety of wildlife including herons, Arizona turtles and a variety of ducks.

The natural spring flow fluctuates at various times during the year due to drought. While visiting Agua Caliente you many see the lower ponds dry.

parks for picnics and rentals
Picnics, walking trails and wildlife are enjoyed at Agua Caliente

Relax on a bench and watch dozens of turtles sunning themselves.  While visiting the park it feels like we arrived in some exotic place hidden in the Sonoran Desert.

Arizona turtles
turtles at Agua Caliente

The ducks, birds and turtles entertain us at our picnic table while we wait for the Tucson sunsets.

Tucson park for wedding rental and portraits
A romantic park and perfect wedding background

It is a wonderful reprieve from the heat and definitely not what you would expect to find in Tucson, Arizona.

family picnics by the lake at Agua Caliente in Tucson
many picnic tables and locations to choose from

Adding to its charm, professional photographers frequent Agua Caliente with clients who want a stunning background.

There is a huge mesquite tree east of the ranch house estimated to be over 250 years old!

mesquite tree at Agua Caliente in Tucson
The Old Mesquite tree of Agua Caliente is supported by brick columns and steel poles

To sustain this elderly mesquite tree, Agua Caliente’s administration use brick columns and steel poles to support the enormous branches.

Agua Caliente Mesquite Tree
famous Mesquite Tree estimated over 250 years old

Agua Caliente Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

This extreme east Tucson park is truly an oasis in the desert and is highly recommended for you, your family and friends.

To learn the history of Agua Caliente see my article:  http://tjsgarden.com/2013/08/16/agua-caliente-history-natural-spring-park-tucson-az/

Is Agua Caliente drying up?  : http://tjsgarden.com/2013/09/12/agua-caliente-park-spring-drying-up-tucson/


New baby Javelinas – pig like desert animals

Javelinas have no defined breeding season; therefore you can enjoy newborns all year!  Collared Peccary, Javelinas, most often give birth to twins.  These adorable babies called reds, because of their color, are able to travel with the peccary herd just a few hours after birth.  Newborn javelinas are precocial – able to move freely from birth.

newborn javelina
newborn javelina, collared peccary

Adult grown javelinas do not have many predators other than a mountain lion, but the babies may become prey to hawks, coyotes, and bobcats.

reds, newborn pig like javelina
desert javelina in Arizona
arizona wild pigs - collard peccary
adult javelina with her two babies

Unlike other animals, the javelina does not lick the offspring at birth, but rolls or tumbles it in the dirt.  Newborns weigh in at only one pound.  A baby javelina must be pretty tough to be born and then rolled in the dirt!

collard peccary with pig like babies
desert javelina give birth to twins
baby desert wild pig javelinas
newborn javelinas animals
young javelina reds
baby javelina – desert pig like animals

Javelinas nurse their babies for six to eight weeks.

javelina nursing her young
javelina nursing her young

It will take about 3 months for the reds, baby javelinas, to gain the salt and pepper look of adult collared peccaries.  The young javelina reach adult height in 10 months and both sexes are mature.

For more information and javelina facts:    http://tjsgarden.com/2012/11/17/arizona-javelina-pig-like-collard-peccary/

Because Javelinas breed throughout the year, have early maturity, and the ability to have two litters per year… collared peccary are considered as having the greatest reproductive potential of any North American big game mammal.