Mourning Dove Eggs – How long for dove eggs to hatch?

mourning dove nest
Mourning Dove eggs!

How long does it take for mourning dove eggs to hatch?  The dove eggs will be incubated for 14-15 days; by both the male and the female doves. It takes about the same time for the young doves to leave the nest. The baby doves are fed regurgitated pigeon milk by both parents, and they grow and develop rapidly.

tiny baby birds in nest
dove eggs hatched, baby doves

Mourning Dove breeding season is April – July although some may breed as late as October.  Even in southern Arizona, nesting is essentially over by mid-August, and some of the early hatched Dove juveniles have already migrated by late July.

birds in Arizona
Mourning Doves, Turtle Doves

By the first week of September, the migration of most nesting populations is usually underway;  the juvenile birds typically leaving before the adults.

Beginning as early as March, these birds build a loose nest of twigs, grass, weeds and pine needles. The male dove carries twigs to the female dove who then weaves a flimsy nest of grass stems and twigs to lay her eggs.

mourning dove baby in nest
baby doves are called squabs

Mourning Doves, commonly called Turtle Doves, are one of the most adaptable, widespread North American birds. It is also the leading game bird for sport and meat. Doves are strong fliers and can reach speeds of 55 mph (88 km/h).

These doves occur from the lowest elevations along the Colorado River upward through forests of ponderosa pines to 8,500 feet. Their staple foods throughout the year are primarily small seeds and cultivated grains. In the Sonoran Desert the woeful call of breeding males can be heard as early as February, and pairs have been known to attempt as many as seven nestings in a single season.

baby doves left in the nest
mourning dove squabs 11 days old

During the blooming season of the Saguaro cacti it is typical to see White-winged doves (pictured below) eating the fruits of the giant Saguaro Cactus.

white wing
white winged dove on a saguaro cactus

Although still ranked as one of Arizona’s two most important game birds, dove hunting has since fallen off due to urban expansion, changing farm practices, and more restrictive season arrangements.

male mourning dove nest
male mourning dove caring for its young

Arizona Game and Fish Department, http://www.azgfd.gov/h_f/hunt-info/dove/dove.shtml – When it comes to the early dove season, the hot action will typically be near agricultural areas with grain type crops growing or recently cut. While Arizona is well known for its cotton, the state also produces corn, sorghum, melons, barley, and even wheat – all great dove attractants.  Dove hunting is a very popular tradition, and Arizona has more than 30,000 participate each year.

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Fun description of a tenacious Bird of Prey…. the Cooper’s Hawk !!

Cooper’s Hawks are magnificent and ominous as they perch in a hidden location and watch for prey.  Occasionally, we see this raptor’s thick legs with large yellow talons clasped to a branch or fence.  The Cooper’s Hawk belongs to the genus Accipiter and is about the same size as a crow.

hawk with yellow eyes
Young Cooper’s Hawk with yellow eyes

In 1828, this hawk species was named after William Cooper, a New York scientist.  The scientific name for hawks is Falconidae.  All hawks are classified as birds of prey and commonly called raptors.  The term raptor means to take by force or to seize.

bird of prey hawk
Juvenile Cooper’s Hawk has yellow eyes

First year juvenile Cooper’s Hawks have yellow eyes and uniformly brown backs and brown vertical stripes on their breasts as pictured above.  These determined raptors are medium sized birds of prey that hunt by sudden dashes from a concealed perch.

hawk bird of prey
Adult Cooper’s Hawk with red eyes

Note the tail of the Cooper’s Hawk;  a rounded, long tail crossed by several dark lines with a distinct white band on the tip.

bird of prey mantling
bird of prey mantling

The above photo shows a juvenile Cooper’s mantling.  What is mantling?   Mantling is when birds of prey hunch their shoulders and spread their wings over a kill to keep it hidden from other predators.

hawk bird with red eyes
Cooper’s Hawk talons – claws

Check out those claws, talons!  There are four, sharp talons on each of the hawk’s feet.  How strong are Cooper’s Hawks talons?  The PSI (pounds per square inch) is 150-200 pounds.  An average healthy man has a PSI of 110.  According to the University of Michigan, the larger the bird the stronger the talons.  Raptor’s talons puncture their prey hard; usually stabbing a vital organ causing the animal’s rapid death.

The talons are opened by leg muscles and will automatically close when the hawk impacts an object; example…. animal or perch.  It is a reflex!

hawk bird with red eyes
Adult Cooper’s Hawk

This hawk eats mostly birds, but will also capture mammals including squirrels and rabbits.  The beak of a raptor bird is sharp and resembles the action of scissors.

birds with red eyes
red orange eyes of Adult Cooper’s Hawk

The older adult Cooper’s Hawks have tan barring on the breast, dark red-orange eyes and a dark cap on the head, like a flat top.

These raptors have excellent vision that contain 5 times the sensory cells per millimeter of the retina than us humans. How do these birds see?  Hawks refract certain wavelengths of light with the colored oils in their eyes.

bird of prey in arizona
Mature Cooper’s Hawk with Red eyes

Certain colors are intensified for the hawk at the expense of others.  The light filtration of the hawk’s eyes make the browns and grays of typical prey items stand out against the filtered greens.

Cooper’s Hawks build their nest in trees that average 25-50 feet high.  Southern Arizona contains several mountain ranges that host large areas of undisturbed forest which these raptors prefer.

 

Cormorants, crested ducks, cottonwood trees and more… at Fort Lowell Park in Arizona

Our Arizona travels brought us not only to a gentle bird refuge; but the historical Fort Lowell Park in Tucson.  This wildlife oasis streaming with ducks, cormorants, turtles and dragonflies was an United States Army post from 1873 till 1891.

City of Tucson Ft Lowell historic park
Fort Lowell’s wildlife pond in AZ

The most prominent building at Fort Lowell was the hospital, the adobe remnants still stand under a protective structure.

Arizona parks for wildlife, bird watching
Tucson’s historic Ft Lowell in 1900

Ft. Lowell lay in ruins for numerous years. The City of Tucson eventually converted the bulk of the former post into Old Fort Lowell Park, which features ball fields, tennis and racquetball courts, a large public swimming pool, and the Fort Lowell Museum dedicated to its days as an active military installation.

**This is a superb choice if you are looking for Tucson activities.

Tucson Parks with history and wildlife birds
adobe remains of Fort Lowell military installation

A lane lined with cottonwood trees, aptly named Cottonwood Lane, glorified the area in front of the officer’s houses.

Historic Cottonwood Lane in Tucson Arizona
large Cottonwood Tree at Ft Lowell Park

Following World War II, the Fort Lowell area grew into a small village which the predominantly Mexican local residents called El Fuerte.

The Fort Lowell Museum is located in the reconstructed Commanding Officer’s quarters.

Stroll from the remains of the Ft Lowell Hospital towards the wildlife pond to enjoy crested ducks with the latest updos.

ducks with hair on their head in Tucson
Brown colored Crested Duck

Catch a glimpse as a pigeon tries to remember the secret code to get passed the duck security.

Fort Lowell park in Tucson, AZ
pigeon stand off with ducks

Dedicated community members adopted Fort Lowell Park to keep it clean and build a protected area for birds.

During our visit we spoke with some of the impressive volunteers with “Friends of Fort Lowell Park” as they were planting trees and tidying up the nesting area.

Tucson Arizona wildlife park with water
nesting area created by Friends of Fort Lowell Park

A regal Neotropic Cormorant bird was standing by to make sure we didn’t decide to jump in and go swimming.

bird watching parks in Tucson Arizona
neotropic cormorants at Ft Lowell Park

Many species of cormorants make a characteristic half-jump as they dive and under water cormorants propel themselves with their feet.

wildlife oasis park in Tucson Arizona desert
community effort at Fort Lowell Park

Thanks to the collaboration of The Friends of Fort Lowell Park and Tucson Parks and Recreation for giving residents and guests a place to enjoy outdoor activities and wildlife in the Sonoran Desert.

tennis handball swimming park in the Arizona desert
Parks to visit in Tucson – Ft Lowell Park

Local historians have found evidence that Fort Lowell Park sits on a site endowed with a continuous supply of underground water and has been occupied by humans since ancient times.

White-winged Doves pollinate Giant Saguaro Cacti

An essential bird pollinator and seed dispenser for the saguaro cactus plant is the white-winged dove.

The white-winged dove, Zenaida asiatica, is a large grayish brown stout bird with the renowned white stripe on their wings.  This bird’s distinctive white wing bars are visible at rest and in flight.

birds with white tip on wings
White winged dove in the desert

The dove sexes look much the same, but the young white wings have a duller and grayer plumage than adults.

white winged dove baby bird
juvenile white winged dove has brown eyes and no blue ring

Juvenile white-winged doves have no blue orbital ring and their legs are brighter pinkish red. These young doves also have brown eyes instead of the adult bird red eyes.

White winged Dove

Adult white-winged doves have a patch of blue, featherless skin around each crimson red eye.

adult male dove bird with red eyes
Male White Winged dove – red eyes w blue ring

Adult males and females look-alike; except male doves are larger in size along with an iridescent sheen on their head and neck.

male white winged dove arizona birds
Male doves puff their chest to show dominance

The white-winged males show various dominant behaviors.  He may crow around.  This means the male dove puffs his chest up and walks around making cooing noises and bobbing his head up and down.

white winged doves in the desert
Male and female doves with red eyes and blue ring

The female white-winged birds don’t usually exhibit this commanding behavior.

dove birds in Arizona at birdfeeder
white winged dove’s white stripe

White-winged doves feed on a variety of seeds, grains, and cactus fruit.  The doves occurring in the Sonoran Desert rely heavily on the pollen, nectar and red fruit of the saguaro cactus, Carnegeia gigantea, for nutrition and water.

white winged dove bird feathers
dove with white tail tip feathers

In the photos above and below you can plainly see this bird’s white tail tips.

bird with white feathers on tail
white winged dove birds in the desert

Male doves seek areas with easy access to food and water; they will defend their breeding territories against intruders and competitors.

These tenacious birds can fly 25 or more miles to find water!

dove bird with white stripe
wing span of white winged dove

Their lifespan in the wild is about 10-15 years.  It is routine for white-winged dove pairs and families to stay together for life.

dove birds in the desert arizona birds
White winged dove tail and wings

The white-winged dove has a bold white band that appears as a brilliant white crescent when flying.

white stripe of the dove bird in arizona
white bar of the White winged dove

When the dove’s wings are closed, this area looks like a white bar on the lower edge of the wing.

arizona desert dove at bird feeder
tenacious birds – white winged doves

In the sweltering desert, white-winged doves are able to draw needed moisture from saguaro cactus fruit.

saguaro cactus with bird pollinating
White winged dove eats Saguaro cactus fruit
birds live on saguaro cactus flowers and fruit
white winged dove with saguaro cactus fruit

White-winged doves are a familiar sight at Saguaro National Park in Tucson, Arizona. The doves migrate to the desert when the saguaro cactus are blooming.  These birds nourish themselves on the buffet of saguaro cactus blossoms and fruit.

The best picnics, family time and perfect weddings at Agua Caliente Spring – (part 2 of 3)

We make it a point to take visitors to Agua Caliente Park.  This is an amazing lagoon; a get away from the prickly pear cacti and saguaros. It’s hard to tell that you’re even in Tucson. Agua Caliente presents you with an abundance of mature shade trees and lush backgrounds for picnics, weddings and even Plein-Air paintings.

family and picnics in the park
one of the best locations for picnics

Roy P. Drachman Agua Caliente Park has a natural hot spring that flows through faults between gneissic rock and has been a long-inhabited settlement.

  • What is gneissic rock?   This type of rock has minerals arranged into layers which seem to be bands that alternate darker and lighter colors. The banding is developed under high temperature and pressure conditions.

Ok now, is Agua Caliente a park, a lake, or a wildlife habitat?  Well this natural spring is a bit of everything!  Pack a picnic, hang out and be sure to bring a camera.

park with water in Tucson, AZ
Gallery and Tucson Audubon in the historic ranch house

If you enjoy bird watching then Agua Caliente Park is worth a visit.  The Tucson Audubon Society is housed in the original Ranch home.

historic house in Tucson
the original Ranch House at Agua Caliente Park

Take a look inside this historic building and enjoy the gift shop and gallery.

Hohokam historical sites
Agua Caliente natural spring in Arizona

The eccentricity of the mountains and mature palm trees are reflected with vibrant color in the water.

Here you can picnic at a 101 acre aquatic / riparian habitat surrounded by the Sonoran Desert.

wildlife parks in Tucson, Arizona
ducks at Agua Caliente Park

At Agua Caliente you will see a variety of wildlife including herons, Arizona turtles and a variety of ducks.

The natural spring flow fluctuates at various times during the year due to drought. While visiting Agua Caliente you many see the lower ponds dry.

parks for picnics and rentals
Picnics, walking trails and wildlife are enjoyed at Agua Caliente

Relax on a bench and watch dozens of turtles sunning themselves.  While visiting the park it feels like we arrived in some exotic place hidden in the Sonoran Desert.

Arizona turtles
turtles at Agua Caliente

The ducks, birds and turtles entertain us at our picnic table while we wait for the Tucson sunsets.

Tucson park for wedding rental and portraits
A romantic park and perfect wedding background

It is a wonderful reprieve from the heat and definitely not what you would expect to find in Tucson, Arizona.

family picnics by the lake at Agua Caliente in Tucson
many picnic tables and locations to choose from

Adding to its charm, professional photographers frequent Agua Caliente with clients who want a stunning background.

There is a huge mesquite tree east of the ranch house estimated to be over 250 years old!

mesquite tree at Agua Caliente in Tucson
The Old Mesquite tree of Agua Caliente is supported by brick columns and steel poles

To sustain this elderly mesquite tree, Agua Caliente’s administration use brick columns and steel poles to support the enormous branches.

Agua Caliente Mesquite Tree
famous Mesquite Tree estimated over 250 years old

Agua Caliente Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

This extreme east Tucson park is truly an oasis in the desert and is highly recommended for you, your family and friends.

To learn the history of Agua Caliente see my article:  http://tjsgarden.com/2013/08/16/agua-caliente-history-natural-spring-park-tucson-az/

Is Agua Caliente drying up?  : http://tjsgarden.com/2013/09/12/agua-caliente-park-spring-drying-up-tucson/


Curve-billed Thrasher – AZ desert birds with personality!

With their long tails, melodious songs and zesty personalities, the Curve-billed Thrasher is one of my favorite Arizona birds.

bird that bounces around and pounds the ground
Curve Billed Thrasher is a confident desert bird

Each bird possesses its own charisma.  And sing…?  Oh yes this bird can sing!

The Curve-billed Thrasher, Toxostoma curvirostre,  is a common bird species of the Sonoran Desert.

Order: Passeriformes
Family: Mimidae (Mockingbirds and Thrashers)

tucson bird digs the ground
curve billed thrasher bird arizona, red eyes

These desert birds are grayish, brown with a long tail and faint spots on the chest.  An adult Curve-billed Thrasher has vivid orange or red-orange eyes.  Juvenile birds have lighter yellow eyes.

gray brown bird with long beak orange eyes
Curve billed Thrasher’s long tail, birds with red eyes

Have you seen a Curve-billed Thrasher (Toxostoma curvirostre)?  Then you’ve already witnessed their daring personality and fondness for charging into groups of birds provoking chaos.

Desert birds of the Southwest
Curve-Billed Thrasher orange red eyes bird

This Southwest bird is a ground lover.  Curve-billed Thrashers fly in abrupt jerky fashion from bush to bush.  They especially like areas with thorny mesquite trees or cholla cacti.

a bird that pounds the dirt with its beak
Thrasher birds flick the rocks looking for insects

This bird probes the dirt and leaf litter with its long, black, down curved beak.  While digging holes in the soil, the Curve-billed Thrasher flicks aside debris in search of seeds and insects.

Arizona birds
A thrasher bird foraging on the ground for food

In worker fashion, Curve-billed Thrashers use their robust legs and feet to shuffle through the plant litter beneath a cactus or shrub.

arizona desert birds
Curve-billed Thrasher’s long tail

In the U.S., this bird occurs most commonly in the southern parts of Arizona, New Mexico and western TexasMost of the country of Mexico is blessed to enjoy the sights and songs of the Curve-billed Thrasher.

Bird with yellow eyes
red eyes of the curve billed thrasher bird
Curve billed Thrasher
two adult Curve billed Thrasher birds in the AZ desert

This male and female thrasher look very much alike.  Immature birds are similar to the adults but with shorter, straighter bills and yellow instead of orange-red eyes.

It is the custom of this long-lasting pair of birds to mate in the winter after a charming courtship filled with song.

Arizona Sonoran Desert birds
adult Curve-billed Thrasher with its young

Beginning early spring the two birds cooperate in building a nest;  creating a deep bowl-shaped structure lined with long, thorny twigs.

Curve-billed Thrashers prefer the lower shaded branches of the cholla cacti;  while the Cactus Wren bird will build a ball-shaped nest on a higher cholla cactus branch.

Breeding usually takes place from May to mid-July.  The female Curve-bill Thrasher lays her spotted bluish-green eggs early in the morning on successive days, usually producing a total of 3-5.

blue green eggs with spots by cactus
bluish-green eggs in the nest of the Curve-billed Thrasher

The eggs hatch in about fourteen days.  The young birds will leave the nest, approximately, six weeks after the female produces her first clutch.

Arizona state bird - cactus wren
this Cactus Wren may nest in a Cholla Cactus near a Curve-billed Thrasher’s nest

For the next several weeks, Curve-billed Thrasher parents nurture the fledglings, still answering their cries for food but teaching them foraging to encourage their independence.

a bird that bounces around the yard
Curved billed Thrasher is a bird with personality

Unfortunately, this bird has lost a considerable part of its south Texas brushland habitat. And the expanding cities of Tucson and Phoenix are causing a rapid loss of habitat in Arizona.

Curve Billed Thrasher, Toxostoma curvirostre
Birds of Arizona, TX and Mexico

Although there has been little conservation work directly focused on the Curve-billed Thrasher; much work has been directed at protecting habitats in some areas where the species occurs.

Information on where Curve-billed Thrashers occur and in what numbers is vital to conserving the species. A project of Audubon and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, eBird is the world’s first comprehensive online bird monitoring program: http://www.audubon.org/bird/ebird/index.html

Gambel’s Quail are our favorite daily desert bird visitors – Callipepla gambelii

Gambel’s quail are very common in Arizona. Out the window I spotted a COVEY,  small family,  of Gambel’s quail covering themselves from the rain.  These birds PUFF up, for insulation, with their feathers to help stay warm.

Gambel's Quail
male, female, baby Gambel’s Quail in the rain

Gambel’s quail were discovered by Dr. William Gambel in 1841 and named in his honor.  These quail hide and nest under brushy, thorny shrubs, and dine on seeds, leaves, cactus fruits, ants and other insects.

bird with black face red hat
Gambel’s Quail, Male quail with baby chicks

Gambel’s quail live in the hot deserts of the Southwest — the Sonoran, Mohave, and Chihuahuan at elevations below 5,000 feet.

Quail in Tucson Phoenix Arizona Texas
covey of Gambel’s Quail

This photo of the quail chicks with mom and dad was taken from our back patio.  The female Gambel’s quail is the lookout while the family eats thistle seed I keep on the porch.

native desert birds of arizona
Male Gambel quail being a lookout for the bird family

If there is any danger, the lookout will issue an alarm sound and the Gambel’s quail family will sprint for cover!

Arizona gray Birds that have a red hat
Male Gambels Quail look like they have a red hat with a black feather

These delightful, lovable birds prefer walking to flying and typically fly only to avoid danger or to roost.

How fast can Gambel’s quail run?  These desert quail can run up to 15 miles per hour.  If startled and to avoid a predator they can fly up to 40 miles per hour.

Quail in Arizona
Male Gambel’s Quail

Both male and female Gambel’s quail have a comma-shaped bobbing plume of feathers on top of their small heads. Males have gray, cream and black patterns that serve as excellent camouflage.  Female Gambel’s quail lack the distinctive head pattern and are grayer overall.

Arizona Phoenix Tucson Birds quail
Female Gambel’s Quail bird

Everyday we see these chunky quail running from cover to cover in the desert shrubs. The dense cover provides shelter and camouflage for these unique desert birds.  They are so entertaining to watch!

birds nest with white eggs with brown spots
spotted eggs in a Gambel Quail nest

Female quail usually select nest sites on the ground. Preferably this bird nest is hidden under a shrub, rock, or protected site.

male female Gambel's Quail
male and female Gambel’s Quail

This bird’s predators are coyotes, bobcats, snakes and carnivorous birds.  Extreme weather can be the greatest enemy of the Gambel’s quail because harsh conditions reduce the growth of the plants that provide this bird with food and shelter.

We have had the exciting experience of watching as they go from eggs to chicks ready to run with their mom and dad!

Gambel's quail keeping watch
Gambel’s quail keeping watch with our mourning doves

The quail chicks eat mostly insects like ANTS, while the parents eat the seeds of berries, grasses, cactus fruit, and other plants.  Gambel’s quail obtain water from plant material, but still need some free water.  We keep water available throughout our property.

Male Gambel's quail
Male Gambel’s quail as a lookout

The baby quail stay close to their parents.   Gambel’s Quails run across the road in groups called coveys that can include a dozen or more birds.

Gambel's quail family running across the street
Gambel’s quail covey running across our road

The covey, quail family, form a line as they dodge in and out of cover in the desert sun, with the father leading the way. The baby birds are followed by the female quail pulling guard duty in the rear.

Tucson Quail birds
Female Gambel Quail and baby

The lookout quail will make distinct warning sounds to alert others.  Male Gambel’s quail are heard making calls for the family, covey members.  Listen to the short youtube video to hear the male quail calling his covey.

Gambel Quail Male
Male Gambel’s quail stares at his reflection

Gambel’s quails are sometimes called Desert quails.

Gambel's quail
Gambel’s quail in our front yard

A few extra facts about Gambel’s quail:

  • Average life expectancy for a wild desert quail is 1.5 years.
  • Mom lays 10 or more eggs in a nest protected by vegetation or under a rock.
  • Female Gambel’s quail are in charge of the incubation.  In approximately 3 weeks,  the quail chicks will all hatch on the same day and within hours will be out of the nest to run around with mom and dad.
  • Gambel’s quail have been introduced to the Hawaiian Islands.

My best Mourning Dove photos so far…

Over the past 6 months I have watched mourning doves survive in our unforgiving desert environment.  Following the quails, mourning doves have begun to mimic their behavior.

Mourning Dove Arizona Gambel's Quail desert
Mourning Dove with Gambel’s Quail

I’ve witnessed mourning doves out fly and out maneuver various hawks.  Always learning, mourning doves are honor roll students of the Sonoran Desert.

Tucson Phoenix birds Mourning Dove
Mourning Dove in Arizona
Tucson mourning dove birds Turtle Dove
mourning doves in a palo verde tree
larger male dove bluish eye bird
male mourning dove, Turtle Dove

Male mourning doves are bigger than females but their color is very similar.  The difference between male and female mourning doves:

  • Males have a bluish-gray crown; along with a rose color on the breast.
  • Male mourning doves can have an iridescent patch on the neck area.
  • Females have a grayish brown crown and a brownish tan breast area.
Arizona birds Turtle Doves
Mourning Dove in Arizona Desert
dove birds drinking water
mourning dove after a rain storm

Mourning doves successfully live in arid areas because they have no problem traveling several miles for water.  Their diet consists of mostly dry seeds; therefore, they must have water daily.  Mourning doves drink faster than other birds which helps them avoid predators who stay by available water.

dove squabs male and female dove
baby mourning doves 8 – 10 days old in nest

Baby mourning doves, SQUABS,  have a white patch under the eye which you can see in the photo above.

doves in Tucson Phoenix birds blue eyes
mourning dove photos
doves eating with full crop
mourning dove with his crop

Mourning doves eat enough to fill their crops and then find a comfortable location to digest.  What is a crop?  A crop is part of the digestive tract that acts as a storage bag to hold food until it can be processed by the body.

When a mourning dove feeds in the open it must be careful of predators; therefore, it will gobble up seeds as fast as it can.  The food fills up in the bird’s crop and the mourning dove hurries to safety for digestion.

dove birds in Tucson Phoenix
mourning dove getting ready to preen itself

What is preening?  When a bird grooms its feathers it is called preening.

This short video below shows a male and female mourning dove preening each other.  It is a lovely dove behavior to witness.

doves with white marks brown color birds
young morning dove squabs juvenile

Young mourning doves are darker than adults and have a white patch under the eye.  A mourning dove will reach maturity in approximately 3 months.  Mortality rate for young mourning doves is high.  On average the life span of a mourning dove is 1-3 years which is mostly due to disease and starvation.  Currently we have 70 or so mourning doves we feed daily.

Baby mourning doves update – squabs are 10 days old – Part 3

The mourning dove hatchlings, squabs are 10 days old.  They are becoming Fledge,  Fledge is the stage that these young doves develop feathers and wing muscles that are sufficient for flight. It takes about 14 days for the mourning doves to fly and leave the nest. The parents will still care for the young squabs for 25-27 days of age where they will be left to be on their own.

mourning dove babies
mourning dove squabs, hatchlings exercising

The mom and dad mourning doves have started leaving the babies alone for several hours at a time.  This dove behavior is to encourage the babies to start learning balance and exercising.  The mourning dove squabs, babies, will be flying out of the nest pretty soon.

mourning dove babies
mourning dove babies alone in the nest
mourning dove nest
mourning dove daddy still spends time in the nest

The mourning dove parents can only lay beside the baby doves because the 10 day old babies are plenty warm with their own feathers.

part 4 in the making….  final stage coming, I’ll be sad, and happy, to see the hatchlings go

 

Mourning Doves are vigilant parents – baby, mourning dove feeding – Part 2

The mourning dove babies are six days old.  I have been blessed to watch the dove parents safeguard and feed their hatchlings.  Think me silly or emotional?  Doesn’t matter.  If all human moms and dads were as attentive to their young as mourning doves, this world would be a better place.  With all due respect to the mourning doves, I will give short recaps of the hatchlings days.

Eyes still shut unaware of a new life…  See previous post, below, of newborn dove babies.

http://tjsgarden.com/2012/08/05/mourning-doves-eggs-hatching-baby-chicks-incubation-feeding/

hanging planter as dove nest
doves nest in the hanging planter

A male and a female mourning dove, turtle dove, found love in southern Arizona.  Their courtship includes the paired doves grooming each other’s feathers.  Later, the male takes his mate to potential locations for a nest.

Arizona sun can be very hot but no worries, the female Mourning Dove chooses the best nest site.  The male dove travels about, gathering material like twigs & grass to bring to the female for building the nest.

Our female mourning dove chose the top hanging basket on our front porch to lay her 2 white eggs.

Both parents incubate and nurse their squabs, nestlings.  The mom and dad take turns so perfectly as if to synchronize their watches.

new born baby doves
baby mourning doves

This new life of four days;  knowing nothing of this earth. Brother where are we?  What do we do?

Sister, just be.  Just be.  “Love will bring us health allowing us to grow and become strong.”

No worries sister, love is coming.

mourning dove feeding babies
daddy dove taking the day shift in the nest

I took the above picture through a window because I do not want to do anything that will scare the dove parents.  Mourning doves will abandon a nest and babies is they feel threatened.

Daddy mourning dove arrives in the early morning to relieve mom and take the day shift.  The male dove arrives approximately 7am and does the later switch with mom about 5pm.

Mourning Doves eat mostly seeds, but the young are fed crop milk from their parents.

What is the food the female dove feeds to her babies?  Mourning dove birds have an extra lining, called a crop or croup,  that is near the throat.  The dove’s food is temporarily stored in the crop before digestion.

In Mourning Doves the secretion in the lining of the crop produces crop milk that is regurgitated for the young doves.

mom mourning dove
female mourning dove watching her nest

While dad is babysitting the two youngsters and tidying up the nest, mom keeps a watchful eye across the garden.

Mrs. Mourning Dove tries several locations in the yard until she finds the perfect area to have full view of her cherished family.

A male white winged dove landed on the ground and the female mourning dove turned into SUPER MOM.  In a split second and without fear she flew down to defend her territory.

Female Mourning Doves are much smaller than White Winged Doves especially the male dove birds.  I let the dogs out to scare the intruder away.  The mourning doves and our dogs seem to have a mutual respect for one another.

mourning doves 4 days old
dove hatchlings in their nest

One of the squabs, dove babies, is bigger and more alert.  Hopefully it is a male, female difference?   I yearn for these young mourning doves to be healthy and strong enough to survive.   These newborns deserve an opportunity to experience their life and God’s creation.  xxoo

Part 3 is in the making…..   stay tuned!!!

Mourning Dove eggs are hatching, dove eggs incubation period, feeding baby doves – Part 1

How long does it take for dove eggs to hatch?  The incubation period for dove eggs is 14-15 days.  Then another 2 weeks for the baby dove chicks to leave the nest.

The dove chicks, hatchlings, squabs pictured below are one day old, both eyes are closed.

baby dove chicks hatched eggs
baby dove squabs in nest, closed eyes

I’m a proud Auntie!  We have been very quiet so as – NOT to startle the mourning dove away from her nest.  Last time these mourning doves made their nest I was too involved and sadly scared them away leaving the eggs in the nest abandoned.  I felt horrible.

baby morning dove nest
newborn doves 1 day old squabs, Turtle Doves
mourning dove hatchlings turtle dove nest
mourning dove hatchlings, opened eyes

The one day dove hatchlings opened their eyes.  The female dove left very early this morning so I was able to snap a couple quick photos before the male dove comes to take the day shift. This bird family will get their privacy and no disturbances from us, so the squabs will be taken care of by mom and dad dove.

squabs in bird nest
baby mourning dove nest

Why do doves abandon their nest? Nest abandonment is very common with Mourning Doves.  If a dove feels any threat from predators whether human or animal, the dove may go elsewhere, abandoning both eggs and babies.

Below is a short video showing how to feed a baby mourning dove that was rescued.  I educated myself and am prepared just in case I have to feed or care for these hatchlings.

If you find an abandoned bird it is best to take it to a wildlife sanctuary. Baby birds can be hand-fed and raised until they can be released back to the wild.

The mourning dove’s nest in the photo is in our Arizona garden.

A Greater Roadrunner was in the garden – Roadrunner bird pictures

At my first glance,  I thought this roadrunner looked like a hawk. The face and the large talons were the most prominent feature I saw.  The long tail and large size told me it was surely a Greater Roadrunner.   We have a bird’s nest on the porch and I was concerned the roadrunner was after the dove eggs.

picture of a Greater Roadrunner

The Greater Roadrunner, classified as Geococcyx californianus, meaning “Californian Earth-cuckoo,” is a long-legged bird in the cuckoo family, Cuculidae. There are only 2 species in the roadrunner genus Geococcys, the Lesser Roadrunner and the Greater Roadrunner.  The roadrunner is also known as the chaparral cock, ground cuckoo, and snake killer.   Named for its habit of running along roads in front of cars before darting off into brush, the greater roadrunner is a chicken-like bird with brown, black and white feathers. It has a recognizable crest of black feathers on its head which can be raised or lowered at will. The bird has a long tail with a blue beak and legs. Greater roadrunners are two feet long and weigh about 10 ounces.

Greater Roadrunner in Arizona

The other birds moved out of the roadrunner’s way but stayed in the tree.  The birds were not frightened of the roadrunner just seemed to bid him respect.   Mr Roadrunner sort of hopped, flying around which made it hard to take a picture.  Contrary to popular belief, the roadrunner is not a flightless bird. It has useable wings to propel it onto perches and over obstacles, but otherwise the greater roadrunner keeps its feet on the ground.  How fast is a roadrunner?  When on ground the roadrunner has a top speed of nearly 20 miles per hour, making it the fastest running bird capable of flight. It uses this speed to run down its prey of insects, snakes and small mammals.

a large roadrunner

I have seen roadrunners cross roads and pass quickly in desert parks and they seemed small to medium size.  This up close roadrunner is triple the size I imagined. The pictures do not express his true height.

Majestic Greater Roadrunner

The greater roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus) is a ground-dwelling bird native to the arid deserts of the southwestern United States and much of Mexico. It is slightly larger but otherwise similar to the lesser roadrunner, which resides farther south into Central America.

Greater roadrunners make rudimentary nests out of sticks low in bushes or cacti. Mating seasons depend upon weather conditions, but when a new pair is courting, the male will attempt to impress the female roadrunner by offering her food; if she accepts the male, the two will likely mate for life. Roadrunner broods contain 2-8 eggs that must be incubated for 20 days.

Greater Roadrunner

In the wild, greater roadrunners can live up to 8 years. The mated pair will maintain and defend their territory year round. Doing so means they must avoid predation by carnivores native to the desert environment including hawks, coyotes and raccoons.  Roadrunners frequently ambush and prey upon small songbirds at bird feeders, I didn’t realize this and I will have to make some changes in our garden.

Glad I could share this with you.

Mourning Dove Eggs – Mrs. Dove has made her nest – also called Turtle Doves

This lovely mourning dove has been building her nest in the same place for several years. The male dove carries twigs to the female dove who then weaves a flimsy nest of grass stems and twigs to lay her eggs. Congrats to the Mourning Doves, Turtle Doves, for their nest building teamwork!

Doves Eggs
Mourning Doves eggs

Turtle, Mourning Doves are not bothered by us humans. Commonly gutters, eaves and abandoned equipment are seen with Doves Nest. Last year, this graceful bird built a nest atop our treadmill on the back patio. Obviously we were not using it. No wonder we put on the pounds! That is a separate article… 🙂

doves nest
Mourning Doves Nest. This dove is happy to make her nest in our hanging mint plant.

Out of all the hanging plants in our garden the Mourning Dove picked this potted plant. I wasn’t sure how growing a mint plant in a hanging pot would do in the Arizona heat. Although the Mint Plant is  NOT drought tolerant, it is certainly heat tolerant and thriving in our desert garden. Partially shaded by the Chilean Mesquite Tree and extremely fragrant, this mint plant is making the best nesting area for our lovely Mourning Dove.

dove sitting on eggs
A Graceful Mourning Dove in her nest

It is common for a Mourning Dove to reuse their nest.  Our Mrs. Dove has reused this nest for several years. This is her second time in this doves nest over the past 2 months.  I’m going to be very careful to not bother this mommy dove. It is not an easy task to keep the dogs from scaring our precious dove.

Why do doves abandon their nest? Nest abandonment is very common with Mourning Doves.  If a dove feels any threat from predators whether human or animal, the dove may go elsewhere to nest, abandoning both eggs and nestlings.

How long does it take for dove eggs to hatch?  The dove eggs will be incubated for 14-15 days. It takes about the same time for the young dove chicks to leave the nest. Mourning Dove breeding season is April – July although some may breed as late as October.

mourning doves
mourning doves in love

TIDBITS:  Mourning Doves, commonly called Turtle Doves, are one of the most adaptable, widespread North American birds. It is also the leading gamebird for sport and meat. Doves are strong fliers and can reach speeds of 55 mph (88 km/h).